Guy Fawkes’ Night

The fifth of November British people celebrate Guy Fawkes’ Night or Bonfire Night. The story goes back to the early 1600s when there were many religious problems between Protestants and Catholics in Britain. King James I was a Protestant and passed severe laws against Catholics, so a group of Catholics decided to kill the king by blowing up the Houses of Parliament. This was called the Gunpowder Plot and was planned for the 5th November 1605.

Guy Fawkes had the responsibility to guard the barrels of explosives and light the fuse on that night, but the plot was discovered and Guy Fawkes, as well as the other plotters, were hanged.

On the night of 5th November 1605 many people in London started to celebrate that the plot had been unsuccessful and made bonfires in the street.

Ever since British people celebrate Guy Fawkes’ Night on that night. People make a Guy with old clothes and fill it with paper. They go around the streets with it asking for ‘a penny for the Guy’ and with that money they buy fireworks and have bonfires in their back gardens. In some towns, there are brilliant fireworks and big bonfires to burn the Guy and some people even dress in historic costumes.

(source: British and American Festivities. Black Cat)

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2 responses to “Guy Fawkes’ Night

  1. Did you know that…? V, the main character at the comic-book V for Vendetta written by Alan Moore

    and adapted in a film two years ago

    wears a mask of Guy Fawkes representing his anti-system fight in a post nuclear fascist England.
    The name “V” cames from Vendetta, and is said that makes reference at “V from Victory” as Winston Churchill said during World War II to encourage England against the Nazis.
    Even though I have just call it a comic-book, this piece of work deserves the name of graphic-novel to emphasize the great quality it has. I hope you like it if you decide to read it.

    Bye!

  2. Pingback: 2010 in review « This is NOT double dutch to me!

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